code manual

Share code examples or discuss embedded software, including device drivers, interrupt handlers, middleware and application code.

Moderators: Markus Girdland, Mattias Norlander

nuclear__
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:05 am

code manual

Postby nuclear__ » Sun Jan 21, 2018 5:47 pm

Hi there, i'm completely new to arm, jumping from 8bit mcu's. Is there any manual with commands helping to start from the beginning? Is forum the best way to start (I think it helps but cannt replace a pdf)? I was used to ccs compiler of an others manufacturer mcus. Command formatting etc has many differences here. If there is any link or pdf I have missed, please tell me.

Markus Girdland
Posts: 149
Joined: Thu May 11, 2017 11:27 am

Re: code manual

Postby Markus Girdland » Tue Jan 23, 2018 1:49 pm

Hello there!

I hope you will like what you see and I get it, the first impression can be overwhelming.
I would suggest that you read the user guide. You can access it through TrueSTUDIO by going to "Help -> Information Center -> User guide". We also have a YouTube channel with some great guides done by Mattias, if you prefer to learn that way.

nuclear__
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:05 am

Re: code manual

Postby nuclear__ » Thu Jan 25, 2018 10:28 pm

Thank you for your responce. I will stay close to youtube channel and info I can find here. Manual refers to gui as I can see, helpful but not what I ment. I mean a handbook with statements. Like if...then, variable declaration and so on..... So to discover by the easy way the small or big differences in syntax.

dcomer
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2017 11:33 am

Re: code manual

Postby dcomer » Sun Jan 28, 2018 7:57 pm

You can also use the "Download New Example From TrueSTORE". The icon for this is in first set of icons on your TrueStudio toolbar beneath the menu items "File Edit Source" and appears like an arrow pointing downwards. This is an excellent way to start, in my opinion. Also, RTFM; I don't mean that sarcastically, read the Atollic TrueSTUDIO User guide. It not only discusses most of the features of the IDE, but is also a great overview of the Eclipse environment. Atollic has done a great job producing the IDE.

Good Luck,

Dave

nuclear__
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:05 am

Re: code manual

Postby nuclear__ » Mon Jan 29, 2018 1:22 am

Thanks.
I will!

DD4DA
Posts: 46
Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2018 10:06 pm

Re: code manual

Postby DD4DA » Sat Feb 10, 2018 12:40 pm

I had moved from 8Bit AVR to STM32 a few years ago. Themain reason was, that the AVR's are very expensive and the development tools are mostly rubbished. A simple OCD-Probe from Atmel consumed $300.- and was not able to do all tasks, thats the chip requireds to get a full control.
As an example: "Parallel High-Voltage programming" to get the full control back if the fuses are burned in a wrong way. You need a sepperate STK board to do this.
Well, the main different is the startup code of every MPU, that's required and you need to initialize the clock for the bridges and peripheral on chip I/O devices like Shift registers, SPI, I2C, I2S and a simple I/O.
The main advantages of the Cortex-M, (especially the STM32) related to an AVR is the less complex memory handling. External memory and internal memory is mapped in the same address range. Their is no XDATA Segment available. The Cortex MPU looks more like a von-Neumann machine as a modified Harvard, that AVR is based upon. You must take care what kind of MPU you use. Their are some differents - mostly in the tiny mpu's like Cortex-M0 (strait von-neumann). bevor you starts with a project, watchout the requirements and catch a nucleo or discovery board to do some test with them. They are cheap and wide available, contain's a JTAG(SWD) for downloading AND ON-CHIP DEBUGGING.
In addition, many examples that match this board from ST are available for just load, compile and start. You are able to discover the Cortex-M world with less money and a wide range of support - here and on other internet sides. If you decide to use the chips from ST, a good reference is the website of ST to get all documentations about the board, (layout, BOM, Schematics), MPU itself, and a detailed description of the entire device.
ST has a bunch of contracts with third-parties and this makes it able to use libs like Seggers expensive graphic environment "emWIN" for free.
The most examples of ST based upon this.
If you choose a Board like the new STm32H767, that's a big-bang compared by ATMEGA / Arduino. This board comes up with 400MIPS and got some very nice features for just less that $30 bugs.
check the examples and decide you first for a small and cheap board, where many examples are available. I would recommend an STM32F429 board, who comes with a 3" Touch display. It's cheap and the F4 core is supported by HAL.
PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE - DON'T USE THE stdLIBs (standard-Libraries). They are obsolete and deprecated. This are not available for F7 or newer chips.

Take some time and do your experiences with some small projects at the start time.

nuclear__
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:05 am

Re: code manual

Postby nuclear__ » Sat Feb 10, 2018 2:15 pm

Well after a brief search i made the same conclusions about cost and support so i chose st. I bought a nucleo 32f767 to begin . I must start thinking different with this platform. Thank you for your tips

DD4DA
Posts: 46
Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2018 10:06 pm

Re: code manual

Postby DD4DA » Sat Feb 10, 2018 5:56 pm

nuclear__ wrote:Well after a brief search i made the same conclusions about cost and support so i chose st. I bought a nucleo 32f767 to begin . I must start thinking different with this platform. Thank you for your tips


Yepp, and you have a lot of fun with this board and MPU. Compared by the AVR, that's a different world. You have Power, Code memory and RAM enought to do the things you ever want.
You will later use an RTOS to get more control of the processing and have less timing issues. The STM32F767 comes with around 200 Mhz and alot of versatile interfaces. To start, just use the examples of ST, HAL and atollic.
I also would recommended to replace the st-link software of the on-board debugger by the free available j-link firmware. This is just an exe file that starts the replacement and u are able revert them with the same tool - as often you want.
The j-link firmware is slightly faster and more reliable in debugging. atollic supports this - (AC6 not) and it gives you a fine developing system with very less amount of costs.
If you need some help, just ask.

stephenwinget
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Sep 22, 2018 5:58 pm

Re: code manual

Postby stephenwinget » Sat Sep 22, 2018 6:03 pm

The user needs the particular part which will be going to proceed it through an exe file that starts the replacement and u are able to have it with the help of hp support australia will manage the part through the information where it is going to adapt the part.

DD4DA
Posts: 46
Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2018 10:06 pm

Re: code manual

Postby DD4DA » Fri Oct 26, 2018 10:14 pm

stephenwinget wrote:The user needs the particular part which will be going to proceed it through an exe file that starts the replacement and u are able to have it with the help of hp support australia will manage the part through the information where it is going to adapt the part.



can u explain it more, what the hell ur talking about?


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